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Battle at the Saranac River Bridge, from an old print
Reproduced from THE PICTORIAL FIELD-BOOK OF THE WAR OF 1812 by Benson J. Lossing. (1869)

Historic Plattsburgh, New York
on Lake Champlain

By James P. Millard

The City of Plattsburgh itself was the scene of pitched battles during the War of 1812. The area now known as downtown was the site of some of the heaviest fighting as the British attempted to cross the bridges on the Saranac River. Pictured below are some of the historical treasures in the city. 
For information regarding Plattsburgh Barracks, click here.
(Click for map)


Images from Plattsburgh and the surrounding countryside

(Clicking on the thumbnails will bring up a full size image.)

Macdonough Victory Monument in Plattsburgh
-1-

Captain Geo. Downey's Grave
-2-

Pilot Jos. Baron's grave
-3-


-8-

Lt. Peter Gamble's grave
-4-


-9-

Fort Brown historic marker
-5-

Kent-Delord House
-6-

Site of Fort Brown
-7-

American Army headquarters
-10-

Entrance- Riverside Cemetery
-11-

Plattsburgh Battle Graves
-12-

Plattsburgh Battle graves
-13-

Macdonough Monument
-14-

British Hospital Historical Marker
-15-

Battle scene marker
-16- Monument at Crab Island- photo by Roger Harwood
-18-

 East Beekmantown Cemetery, final resting place of Revolutionary War veterans and soldiers who fought in the Battle of Plattsburgh. Along this road the British right flank advanced toward Plattsburgh
-20- Sampson's Tavern, Ingraham.  The British left wing encamped here
-22-
-24-
-26-
-28-
-30-
-32-
-34- Fort Moreau, largest of Macomb's works at Plattsburgh. On the green at the old Plattsburgh Air Force Base
-36-Pathway of the British, September 6, 1814
-38- Militia Col. Thomas Miller's home, occupied by the British Sept. 6-11, 1814
-39a- Charles Dunham house, the British used the basement of this home as a hospital during the Battle of Plattsburgh. Now the home of the Clinton County Historical Museum
-40-

-1- Macdonough Monument

 -2- Captain George Downie's grave

-3- Saratoga Pilot Joseph Barron's grave (Barron is also listed as having been buried in Burlington, Vermont's Elmwood Cemetery).

-4- Lt. Peter Gamble's grave

-5- Marker at Ft. Brown

-6- Kent-Delord House, headquarters of the British army during the Battle of Plattsburgh

-7- Another view of Ft. Brown

-8- Base of the Macdonough Victory Monument
 
-9- Detail of Macdonough Monument

-10- American Army headquarters, Battle of Plattsburgh

-11- Entrance to Riverside cemetery, burial place of Capt. Downey and others killed in naval battle at Cumberland Bay

 -12-,13- Graves of naval battle dead, large grave in center is that of  Capt. Downey, commander of HMS Confiance

-14- Base of Macdonough monument

 -15- Marker at Charles Dunham house, site of British hospital in downtown Plattsburgh

 -16- Marker at bridge on Saranac River,  scene of land battle

-17- Macdonough Monument

-18- Crab Island Monument
(Photo credit: Roger Harwood)

-19- Mortar Bomb, probably left behind by retreating British troops. (Courtesy of Brown's Funeral Home, Plattsburgh, NY.
Photo credit: Roger Harwood)

-20-,-21- East Beekmantown Cemetery, final resting place of Revolutionary War veterans and soldiers who fought in the Battle of Plattsburgh. Along this road the British right flank advanced toward Plattsburgh

-22-,-23- Sampson's Tavern, Ingraham.  The British left wing encamped here

-24-,-25- Julius Hubbell's law office in Chazy. Used by the British as their headquarters advancing on and retreating from Plattsburgh

-26- Monument to 13 unknown soldiers from the American camp on Cumberland Head who died of Cholera in 1812

-27- Close-up of inscription on the Culver Hill monument

-28-,-29- Culver Hill monument, site of engagement between American regulars and the British right wing

-30-,-31- Statue of French Explorer Samuel de Champlain

-32- Farnsworth's Tavern- tradition has the British left wing firing upon this building as they passed

-33-,-33a-* The Isaac Platt home, headquarters of Maj. General Robinson. The British wounded at Halsey's Corners were brought here

-34- Monument at the site of the engagement at Halsey's Corners.

-35- Gravesite of Gamaliel McCreedy, Battle of Plattsburgh veteran, Riverside Cemetery

-36-,-37- Site of Fort Moreau, largest of Macomb's works at Plattsburgh. On the green at the old Plattsburgh Air Force Base

-38- Pathway of the British, September 6, 1814

-39-,-39a-* Militia Col. Thomas Miller's home, occupied by the British Sept. 6-11, 1814

-40-* Charles Dunham house, the British used the basement of this home as a hospital during the Battle of Plattsburgh. Now the home of the Clinton County Historical Museum

-41-* The basement entrance to the Charles Dunham house, wounded British soldiers were taken in through this entrance

-42-,-43- The British Flagship Confiance had her anchor shot away during the Battle in Cumberland Bay. You can see the enormous anchor on display in City Hall

-44-*,-45- General Benjamin Moorers home. This was the headquarters of the American Army during the Battle of Plattsburg.

 

Except where noted: All photos by the author, see copyright notice

Macdonough Victory Monument
-17- Huge Mortar Bomb, probably left behind by retreating British troops. Courtesy of Brown's Funeral Home, Plattsburgh
-19-
 East Beekmantown Cemetery, final resting place of Revolutionary War veterans and soldiers who fought in the Battle of Plattsburgh. Along this road the British right flank advanced toward Plattsburgh
-21- Sampson's Tavern, Ingraham.  The British left wing encamped here
-23-
-25-
-27-
-29-
-31-
-33-
-33a-
-35- Site of Fort Moreau, largest of Macomb's works at Plattsburgh. On the green at the old Plattsburgh Air Force Base
-37- Militia Col. Thomas Miller's home, occupied by the British Sept. 6-11, 1814
-39- The basement entrance to the Charles Dunham house, wounded British soldiers were taken in through this entrance
-41-


-42- vintage_hdqts.jpg (30563 bytes)
-44-

-43- American Army headquarters
-45-

ball_in_wall.jpg (25736 bytes)General Benjamin Moorers home. Headquarters of Gen. Alexander Macomb during the Battle of Plattsburgh. Photo at left is of cannonball that entered house through the open front door and lodged in a rear wall. Historical images from The Centenary of The Battle of Plattsburgh: (1914) Courtesy of the Floyd Harwood Collection.



* Reproduced from The Centenary of The Battle of Plattsburg. 1914. (Albany, NY: The University of the State of New York) Courtesy of the Floyd Harwood Collection

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